Sonidam Yelhsa (or, How We Always Seem To Get It Backwards)

What a great premise — free to do what you want to do, serving personal pleasures, without notable consequences, and all with a few clicks on the ‘ole mouse. It’s a great day indeed, forging ahead into amazing opportunities. Pleasure without restraints. No need to defer gratification and actually work through your problems. Everything you want is there for the taking. It’s just… well, who are we kidding — what a load of horse crap.

A dating service geared toward adulteress affairs seems to be the hit thing. Married men and women looking for a good time — outside the marriage contract. Cheat and no one will know it, after all, “Life is short. Have an affair”. But how short is this life? Might be shorter than you think if you get caught.

So what is the goal during our 70 some odd years on the earth? Is it to find “pleasure”? Is it to satisfy our whims through a blatant disregard of others? Are we destined to self-gratify and express our “freedom” any way we choose? Well, is our desire for the forbidden fruit worth losing what we claim to cherish? What if the cheater wasn’t you — but your spouse?

Forethought: the cornerstone of good choices might be your saving grace. But why is it that our society has opted for choices outside of good common sense? Why do those lust-driven, click-of-a-button, wayward sex nomads find solace in cheating? It’s simple, really (although affairs are anything but simple), they have it backwards. To escape what you have in search of something better isn’t about moving outward, but moving inward.

Cheating on someone you love and have committed yourself to is a super cheap thrill that will destroy the foundation of any healthy relationship. I dare say “healthy”, as if to reference some unspoken order of the universe. It’ll destroy the relationship because it fails to nurture it. Imagine a plant that is hurting — lacks water and sunshine — and instead of caring for the plant so you don’t feel like you’ve lost your green thumb, you just go out and buy another plant, feeding and watering it instead. What would you hope to accomplish with your dying plant? Too much work? Well, so be it with the next plant, and the one after that, and so forth. Suddenly, in our “better to replace than repair” society, divorce makes sense — if by sense I mean, “Dumbest idea ever.”

Rather, let’s start thinking backwards and pretend each day is opposite day, flipping poor decisions on their head for the wayward idea that will actually make some real common sense in the end.